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Rossion's Garden


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Rossion's Garden

Rossion's Garden

'my garden' is a partial side-section of my parents house's south facing back garden. I have the west middle section  on which i have  11 times yearly grown succesfully potatoes , and into which I have recently introduced 2 Conferene pear trees; due to lack of concentration on my part when reading up how pear trees - even self-fertile ones- yeild much better with a partner, i however bought two of the same variety Conference which won't cross pollinate! I also have planted (and to my delight it is doing very well) an apple tree (Katy variety) . There are two perennial plants whose identity I am not sure of. They were present in the garden when the family moved in 30years ago. Traditionally, my mother has called them 'stink-horns' and they do produce a funnel that may be a carnivorous function, but i'm not sure. They are extremely hardy and will grow anywhere in the garden if the bulbs are transplanted.(you will see some images of them in my photo album).

Journal

Black Magic

09 June 2017 07:03:00

Thanks to people on this site, the old 'stinkhorn' has been reasigned it's proper (and very fitting!) name of 'Voodoo Lilly'. It really is a sinister looking plant! Its as tough as nails too and seems to adapt easily (at least around here!). Bulbs deposited (even randomly or without intent) produce freckled shoots, green leaves, and that imposing purple flower yearly. Infact, trying to get rid of it would possibly be a problem. The bulbs themselves are ill smelling and attract clouds of midges when unearthed. So I dont!

Scrubber Scrubber 09 June 2017 21:50:33

Oh it looks magical and not a little fearsome! Is it an Arisaema? There's a mushroom-stinkhorn that crops up in my garden and one can smell it at twent yards away!

There are spiders and there are spiders....

07 June 2017 07:48:05

I wish I knew which! My three fruit trees are now home spiders- good! Just  common spiders as I know them, I presume they will keep the ants and aphids under control (yes- the gruesome activity of ants 'farming' aphids that I had only read about is played out before my eyes now!). I've also noticed hoverflies taking an interest in the trees which I be;ieve is good too. However, a fairly sudden flush of red spots on the leaves of the apple tree, and some discoloration on some fruit cause me concern now about the possibility of red spider-mite infestation. It may be just some kind of rust, but if it is likely to become a problem, i'll have to indentify it properly.

fran m fran m 07 June 2017 08:02:13

Can't help I'm afraid, no doubt someone will be able to advise and help.

Jackie Jackie 07 June 2017 08:42:04

Sorry I'm at a loss too but would be interested to know what it is. 

Dick Dick 07 June 2017 11:19:47

Sorry , unable to help.

JoanG JoanG 07 June 2017 20:56:43

Sorry I can't help either.  If members here don't know, you might thinking of sending a query to Gerry Daly, via the Ask Gerry button above.  There are already a lot of answers to garden queries in his database and you might find the solution there. 

Scrubber Scrubber 07 June 2017 23:45:15

Rossion I can only add to the chorus but one is usually advised to remove leaves with red spots of 'rust' on them. But I dont think yours look that bad at all. Your garden site sounds ideal for purpose. I know im very late but would like to say how welcome you are to garden.ie. I have learned all I know about gardening -which is not much I admit- from my wonderfully knowledgeable friends on the site. I note the meditative aspect of your gardening. Its the one place where we all can lose ourselves and find a calm and indeed a comfort in our lives.

Scrubber Scrubber 07 June 2017 23:45:16

Rossion I can only add to the chorus but one is usually advised to remove leaves with red spots of 'rust' on them. But I dont think yours look that bad at all. Your garden site sounds ideal for purpose. I know im very late but would like to say how welcome you are to garden.ie. I have learned all I know about gardening -which is not much I admit- from my wonderfully knowledgeable friends on the site. I note the meditative aspect of your gardening. Its the one place where we all can lose ourselves and find a calm and indeed a comfort in our lives.

Scrubber Scrubber 07 June 2017 23:45:17

Rossion I can only add to the chorus but one is usually advised to remove leaves with red spots of 'rust' on them. But I dont think yours look that bad at all. Your garden site sounds ideal for purpose. I know im very late but would like to say how welcome you are to garden.ie. I have learned all I know about gardening -which is not much I admit- from my wonderfully knowledgeable friends on the site. I note the meditative aspect of your gardening. Its the one place where we all can lose ourselves and find a calm and indeed a comfort in our lives.

Rossion Rossion 08 June 2017 06:14:32

Thank you very much all for your kind responses! Scrubber (it feels slightly odd calling you that!lol) im delighted to find such a pleasant, welcoming and interesting company of people as are here!

TerriShoos TerriShoos 08 June 2017 08:59:33

You could try contacting Irish Seed Savers, what they don't know about apples ain't worth knowing. Send them an email and a pic, they're very helpful. And welcome from me too. :)

TerriShoos TerriShoos 08 June 2017 09:09:58

Just had a look at your album, it's a lovely garden in the making. We grow veggies and flowers and try to live in harmony with our wildlife, which is difficult when the caterpillars strip the kale or the slugs nobble my carefully tended seedlings, but I read that there are around 27 varieties of slug and only a few of them are garden enemies. Most of the others eat decaying matter so we really need them to process waste. So if you're putting leaf-eaters into the compost heap, they'll just go back to the leaves! Garden grit is good, also copper tape, and gravel with wool pellets (though they're expensive) is great for special plants. I do use Sluggo organic pellets too when I get desperate.

Rossion Rossion 09 June 2017 06:09:28

Thats true, TerriShoos- Ive noticed the worst damage to leaves is done by small white slugs (i think I read somewhere about a species that only recently arrived called 'ghost slugs'- they fit the descrition). The larger ones (and I never thought I would be saying this, but some of them have very attractive colouring- russet or coffee brown as well as the less picturesque black and soil brown ones) seem quite content to chomp away at the discarded banana skins et al that I leave for them on the compost heap (not all the time of course, but they are much easier to dislodge and transport that the wee white critters!)

The spotted savious return!

06 June 2017 08:28:07

The day before yesterday- and to my delight- i spotted on one of my pear trees one of those natural allies that can't be dismissed- the Ladybird! There it was, on a new shoot,  presumably feeding ( not that I take any delight in the thought of the fate of those green and black flies in itself- but rather the Ladybirds have their natural meal than I have to kill the former). Only the second I've seen this year, and the first Ive seen on any of the fruit trees. May they increase and prosper!

JoanG JoanG 06 June 2017 20:54:22

That's good news; very few ladybirds here in recent years, sad to say. 

Rossion Rossion 07 June 2017 06:51:37

True Joan, though I didnt know there was a serious problem with their disappearance until i read up about them. I hope they'll come back to us.

Fruitless triumph or tuber victory?- the slug wars

03 June 2017 06:37:35

It would appear ( I have'nt lifted them yet, so I won't jinx it by making a definite assertion) that i have gotten away with it visa-vie the potatoes and the troubled (and troubling) slug population. Not wishing to lead anyone astray from their own wisdom on this matter, I nevertheless believe that the coralling of the slugs into the plentiful compost heap ( i made a barrier of fennel and sprayed fennel tea around my plot and plants too, which only adds another possibility as to the sourse of my potatoes good fortune) has been a success. Whether it will prove an fools hope will be next years business!

Dick Dick 03 June 2017 22:25:55

Wishing you the best with the spuds. I haven't grown any in recent years. One year around July, the stalks tended to wither and Gerry sad that it was likely to be eel worms and leave the ground of same for some years.

Rossion Rossion 04 June 2017 07:13:21

thank you very much, Dick; yes, it is very often advised to rotate crops especially potatoes as if eel-worms do become a pest, it can take years and a lot of treatment to get them out. Ive been remakably lucky on that front- ive had potatoes growing (and flowering and seeding!) here for maybe a decade, though only once before to the same extent as this year.

Jackie Jackie 04 June 2017 08:34:51

Welcome to the site. I wish you the very best with them, Im not into growing veg at all but I do like to see others successes. 

Keego Keego 04 June 2017 21:14:13

Rossian Spuds looking good I have never heard that about Fennell. In our veg garden we had problems with the eel worms really put me off. We have for the last few years grew them in the tunnell with much more success. Do you grow other veg?

Rossion Rossion 05 June 2017 06:40:27

Thank you Jackie and Keego! Ive begun this year with trying out carrots, onions and some beet root; i had tried both turnips and carrots years ago, but they were a total failure. Now that i have more time and interest, i'll experiment a bit more. Yes, fennell is mentioned along with rosemary, garlic and even ground chilli (and bizarrely, coffee too!) as repellents which slugs detest . I think that in the case of fennell and rosemary, the adice is that they are best grown as companion plants alongside the vegetables you wish to protect, as it is the scent of them that the slugs hate. I get confused between eel-worms and wire-worms, but as far i i know the latter are the larvae of click beetles, who actually themseves prey on slugs. I wish you the best of fortune with this years crop!

 

'Stink Horn Plants'? I don't know-

01 June 2017 06:12:40

at each end of the plot in which grow the fruit trees and potatoes are these two, remarkably hardy, perennial and down-right strange plants. They were here when my family came 30 years ago and remain. They were at one stage identified as 'stinkhorn' but i am not sure. They certainly have an odour and i suspect they are infact, insectivorous. But I dont know. in these pictures the 'frond' (again i dont really know what to call them) is just opening for the summer. I dont particularily like them (the bulbs are very unsightly!) but they are there and that will remain.

DeclanfromTipp DeclanfromTipp 01 June 2017 22:00:32

Black Lilies ... Some cal them Voodoo Lilies . Loads here and they contrast well with the White variety 

Deborah Deborah 01 June 2017 22:45:05

These are a fabulous aroid called Dracunculus vulgaris

Rossion Rossion 02 June 2017 05:42:43

Thank you both! much nicer names than 'stinkhorn' (which i thought was a fungus anyway)

 

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