a mediateam website

See a sample issue of The Irish Garden!








TerriShoos's Journal

TerriShoos's Journal

Last Post 7 days 1 hour ago

Anyone for Ratoath?

14 January 2018 16:43:29
Anyone for Ratoath?

Anyone for Ratoath?

Hi all, as the new Gatherings organiser with my astonished hubby (he'll get over it given enough tea and cake) I'm wondering if anyone has any thoughts on dates for Ratoath. The last weekend in May was suggested, though we will have to check when the Burren in Bloom festival is on as we usually have an open day then. I was also wondering if there would be any interest in a Western gathering, perhaps in late summer. Maybe Griffins in Dripsey, co. Cork? We did seem to be lacking a few from the People's Republic so maybe a Cork venue would suit for a change. 

I'm off to the UK tomorrow to visit my siblings, so if you want to comment in the meantime we can get started on the organising the week after next with comments on board. 

Meanwhile thanks a million to Hazel for all her past endeavours. The gatherings really have enriched our lives and made some great friends out of us. 

There's a mole in our midst!!

14 January 2018 16:12:44

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

Lads, I got this from an anthropologist friend at NUI Maynooth, it seems he saw it on an anthro blog called Wild Humans: Tribal Cultures in Modern Europe. Either there was a stray anthropologist at Johnstown, or we have an insider watching our every move!

The Down and Dirty Tribe: Special Report by Daffyd Addledbrow

Here, at a secret location near Naas, shortly after 11am on January 13th, members of the tribe began to gather, clearly attempting to be inconspicuous by parking their cars in a remote corner of a well-known horticultural retail establishment's car park. It was soon clear that their secrecy was due to clandestine exchange rituals. Members of the tribe were apparently well-known to each other, some greeting and initiation ceremonies were also observed. A new member was introduced by an established member, clearly a mentor. The mentor and initiate were signified by the wearing of distinctive headdresses. Exchanges were generally made with good humour and pleasantries, though two women were observed almost coming to blows over the last Ammi Majus. 

Greetings between established members were effusive and apprently affectionate. Exchange relationships, probably connected with status rituals, were signified by the giving and receiving of plants. One older man was seen to attempt to increase status  by the presentation of trees to selected members of the group, assisted by a woman who was probably his mate, though he was also observed in initimate embrace with several other women, indicating that concurrent relationships may take place within the tribe. 

Following this ritual, the group proceeded inside the establishment and took part in a feast, accompanied by a great deal of lively conversation. Following the feast, gifts were exchanged, a ritual carried out by two female tribe members. Two elders, a woman and a man, then stood and made speeches. The woman, clearly a respected tribal leader, announced that she was retiring and asked for volunteers to take over her role. The promiscuous man's mate immediately volunteered, almost certainly in an attempt to establish her own status and dominance over her errant mate, who was clearly surprised by her action. Tribe members sitting nearby seemed greatly amused by his reaction. Cowed, he later presented his raffle-prize gift voucher to his mate in a humble manner.

Thereafter calls were made for a paean to a goddess by the name of Laetitia, by a shaman of high status judging by his garb. The shaman explained that Laetitia had been unable to deliver her accustomed praise-song, and although this was received by groans, with some tribal members wailing and beating their breasts and declaring that spring would never arrive, the group reassured each other. Thereafter all appearance of group solidarity vanished, for with a cry of 'Every gardener for himself, lads!'  the tribe grabbed trolleys and raced into the plant retail arena, to fight over desired specimens of plants. Fangs were bared, members were observed to poke each other with garden implements, and one small woman was pushed to the ground and a trolley rolled over her, to the accompaniment of manic laughter and a cry of, 'That'll teach you to try and get the last Blue Ensign, Joan G!' One woman was mugged by two others for her raffle-prize gift voucher. 

The implementation of a 20% discount soothed violent tendencies and the tribe settled once more into harmony as they bid farewell and departed. Discreet enquiries established that a further Spring ritual is planned at a secret location in Meath. This researcher will be there to record developments in this most interesting tribal group. 

 

And it's back to normal...

09 January 2018 16:53:37

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

The kids have gone home after a wonderful week playing indoors and outside with them. Now I'm looking around at all the untidiness and gagging to get on clearing and  sorting the garden for spring. We sowed some lettuce and beet in the propagator with the kids to use as microgreens, but I'll start off a few seeds in the new shed, which now has heat and extra light, when I get back from visiting my brother and sister next week. 

Meanwhile we're looking forward to Johnstown! Nothing has been mentioned about possible purchases by Himself, but I have a small list in my mind.... ;)

We're still waiting for Santa!

29 December 2017 11:43:19

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

Lots of posts from people who are missing their kids now they've gone back to their lives. Well we are still waiting for ours. Jonny is bringing his kids over on 2nd January for 6 days so we have the turkey in the freezer and the presents under the tree still! 

Meanwhile the bulbs are coming up fast in the new garden. And to our surprise the Prunus Autumnalis has decided to come into full bloom, most unexpected as we only planted it a few weeks ago. It's lovely to see it. 

We won't have much to share at Johnstown this year as we are saving all our spare plants for our youngest son and his wife when they move into their new house and start to create their garden. We can't wait to be working with them, they're both desperate to get planting. 

Well, Johnstown will be a week after the grandkids go home so we'll be glad to have something to lighten us up, we'll be missing them badly. Looking forward to seeing you all there! 

 

Grub's up!

10 December 2017 12:16:51

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

We like to leave the seedheads on the stalks until well into the winter for the finches. In these cold days there are dozens of them all over the feeders and the borders, ferreting around for scraps. Now that so few flowers are out it's lovely to watch them. We had a little snow at dawn this morning after a night of heavy rain, and the poor things couldn't get at their breakfast soon enough. I took the photos a week or so ago, I'm sure others have much more dramatic snowy photos so I'll leave them to the Northern contingent!

Seeing the light

30 November 2017 08:46:20

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

After depressing weeks of gloom and grey, the light these last few sparkling days has been just glorious. We stand at the windows and goggle at the beauty of the sunsets, and looking out on several months of very hard work, it's been worth every last backache. 

The Memory Trees

24 November 2017 09:12:07

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

Sadly we now have two trees in the garden planted in memory of young people. Josh's Betula Jacquemontii is doing well, and the most recent is a Prunus Subhirtella Autumnalis planted for our friends' daughter Eimer, who died in a tragic accident two weeks ago. I have a lovely memory of Eimear as a very tiny tot. She thought my English accent was the funniest thing she'd ever heard, and every time I spoke to her she literally fell over laughing. When I went to photograph the tree, I noticed that its first blossoms had opened. She could brighten a dark room when she walked into it, so we thought a tree in her name to brighten dark winter days would perhaps give her poor parents a tiny bit of confort.

We were very sad too to hear of the death of Matt O'Connell of the Doolin Garden after a long hard battle with cancer. We spent a happy afternoon some years ago admiring his gorgeous garden and chatting plants with him, and came home with some lovely plants which have been divided and dotted about in the garden, with some slips going to other .iers too. 

Gardens have a lot of purposes, but ours contains a lot of memories of people we've known and loved, however fleetingly: Mum's rock garden, Dad's forsythias, Alan's dad's terrace Matt's plants and the Memory Trees. I like the feeling of continuity, of a bit of people going on in those memories. 

The Beckhams have arrived!

24 November 2017 08:49:05

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

We wanted to accentuate the new Forest Garden and contrast with the broadleaves with a couple of Irish yews. The variety is Taxus Baccata 'David' and I really love the way their vertical shapes pick up the vertical rocks. One is skinny and the other is burlier so I thought we'd christen them David and Victoria. No offence intended!

It's wonderful to see crocuses and narcissi popping up already in the new garden. All the plants seem to have settled well, and G.Rozanne has come into bloom despite being divided up, trimmed back and replanted. You can't keep a good geranium down! We've planted a lot of native primroses along the banks of the raised beds below the beech/hornbeam hedge along with bronze bugle and white woodland geraniums.  

To say that we can't wait to see it all come to life in spring is an understatement. Never mind Christmas, we're gagging for spring here!!

 

I can't believe it!

12 November 2017 15:08:03

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

Months after I gave up putting up journals because the site refused to upload albums, I've just gone to upload and it's exactly the same! Obviously Gerry, Craig et al have lost interest altogether. How sad. It was so great to be able to keep all the collections of memories from our gardens. Anyway here are a couple more of today's photos. 

The Very Last Project!

12 November 2017 15:02:19
The Very Last Project!

The Very Last Project!

Yeah, right, I hear you say. Well, of course we'll be tweaking and changing bits and incorporating new plants here and there throughout the garden - that's what gardeners do, isn't it? But three and a half months of backbreaking earth-moving have taught us that we may be fit but there is an age limit to landscaping by hand. Apart from anything else, the rest of the garden has been pretty thoroughly neglected and there's a lot of catching up to do. 

There are still some bits to finish - the summerhouse needs building,  plus some stonework, including the bed for the second yew. But the bulbs are in and the bulk of the perennials too, and the majority of the trees, all except the apple I hope to graft next year and some bare-root woodland edge shrubs when they come in at work. 

We're delighted with it, and can't wait to see it all growing, it's so much nicer than the old drive. But we have both had enough of major projects and are looking forward to going back to ordinary gardening again. After all, even the good Lord knew when to say, 'Okay, that's all  need to create!' and take a day off!

I've put up an album of photos from the beginning if anyone wants a look.

The new baby's growing!

04 October 2017 09:09:12

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

Well the ex-drive actually has the end in sight. I don't know how many barrowloads of gravel and topsoil Mr S has shifted, or how many of turf-dust I have, but the soil's nice for the new plants anyway and we are getting so well-muscled we could enter competitions! It's been lovely planting the baby trees. The first of the Irish yews to go in today or tomorrow. Now that Alan's finally fully retired (or as retired as he's going to get, anyway), it should rocket on. Just as well as the autumn maintenance is piling up!

Pheeeeeeeww!!

18 September 2017 11:27:38

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

Well the panic has been over for a whole week. Yes, there were plenty of flowers out for the wedding, and yes, the bride liked them! It was really lovely to have a part in Rob & Eilish's wedding, and I enjoyed doing the jam jars and bouquets, but I can't say I would ever take floristry up for a living. Too stressful!

September roses

18 September 2017 11:23:51

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

The roses are all bursting into their autumn flush, and how we're enjoying them. They don't do brilliantly here, I think we are a little too limy, but I can't resist them. 

I'm soooooo proud!

30 August 2017 17:21:10
I'm soooooo proud!

I'm soooooo proud!

When the grandkids were here we planted a Betula Jacquemontii for Josh Darlington in the first of the new beds, and I planted several perennials around it. A flower-stem on a penstemon broke off and Cathy decided to 'plant' it so that it could grow. I didn't explain that it was highly unlikely to do anything except die, as I thought that by the time she comes back she'll have forgotten all about it. I trimmed the flower off and most of the stem after she'd gone home and then forgot it myself. So I was astonished to see that it is now producing a few tiny shoots! Her first cutting at the age of five, I am so proud of her! One day, when she's getting her first Gold Medal at Chelsea, I will shed a little tear and think, 'It all started with that tiny penstemon....'

That lovely evening light

29 August 2017 07:33:00

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

Click to zoom

Took these last week, after a fairly gloomy day it turned i9nto a wonderful evening so we got the camera and took some photos then we spent it in the studio doorway reading our books, watching the sun go down over the Burren. One of those evenings that you do all that gardening for!

Members

Garden.ie Members

Not a member yet?
Join now to:

Join Now

Existing Members


Forgotten password
 

Garden.ie CLUB

Join Ireland's first online garden club! Share pictures of your garden, make new friends and chat with other gardeners. It's simple to join and free! Register Here

Featured Members


Know-How!

Thousands of gardening facts at your finger tips:


Ask Gerry

Gerry DalyTry our unique advice service from editor Gerry Daly. Got a question right now? Search here to see if it has been answered already:








a mediateam website



©2018 Garden.ie. Mediateam Ltd, Media House, South County Business Park, Leopardstown, Dublin 18.


Tel (+353 1) 2947777 Email info@garden.ie

Website Design by KCO.ie