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accsean's Journal

accsean's Journal

Last Post 4 days 4 hours ago

Summer stunners.

13 August 2017 19:53:39

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Evening all, I haven't been on the site much lately, as unlike other members gardens my garden isn't too colourful in these months.

Having said that, there is always something to be admired and Hibiscus 'angel heart' is at its brilliant best at the moment. God only knows how good it would be if we got some decent heat.

I adore scented lillies and have a nice few of them around the garden. The one shown in the second photo is almost six feet tall and is most impressive, and the scent is divine.

A seldom seen shrub is Clethra and what a shame, as it is a wonderful addition to any garden. The flowers are also scented and I am very fond of it.

Thanks to Scrubber, waiting and hope.

28 July 2017 15:34:41

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I have to admit that I am very much my own man when it comes to what I like, whether it is music, gardening etc, and like St Brendan when he was ploughing his lonely furrow through North, South, East and West, I go my own way most of the time. But it is always good to know when someone is giving good advice and a few weeks ago Scrubber remarked that a few Marigolds would be nice around the base of the fantastic R.bureavii, as he said the flower colour would go well with the underleaf indumentum. I am glad to say I followed his advice, and even though the photo doesn't capture it properly, the combination works great, so thank you Scrubber and thanks to my Mam for getting them for me.

I planted my Lirodendron tulipflora a good few years ago as I have loved the tree since I saw it in a garden in France, and as it takes years to flower, I wanted it to flower in my lifetime. I bought the variegated form as the normal forms were all too large to fit in my car and I am so pleased with it as the foliage is a joy.

I am lucky that I am very successful with growing my Rhododendrons, as some of them can be fussy and tricky to grow, but one that has never taken off properly is R. fulgens. Hope springs eternal.

Where is the sun gone?

27 July 2017 20:08:20

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Evening everyone. A nasty day here overall, so here are a few photos to compensate in case it was the same wherever you are

R. makinoi is an extremely attractive, narrow leaved species Rhododendron and my first photo today shows it opening some new foliage. Quite delightful. The only drawback is that it can break easily from its roots, but it is well worth taking a chance on it.

The second photo is of inside one of the front walls and the third photo is of a section of the North-Eest garden. There are a nice few gems to be seen in each.

From the pole to Japan.

25 July 2017 20:49:19

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Evening all, a bit of drizzle here now after a lovely couple of days.

As promised, here is a photo of a flower truss on my late flowering hybrid, R. polar bear. This is a splendid Rhododendron, and as a bonus the flowers are scented as well. This is very strong growing and will grow large.

The second shot is of Azalea nipponicum, a species deciduous Azalea and I adore its foliage.This is a most attractive plant.

Here and now and a nod to the future.

13 July 2017 20:09:23

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New foliage unfurling can be extremely attractive and the first photo showing R. polar bear is a fantastic example. It will be flowering in a few weeks as well, so there is a lot to look forward to.

I have Stewartia pseudocamellia in the garden since 2009 and I am very fond of it. Mind you, it is very slow growing. It flowered the first year after I planted it and not a flower since, so I am very pleased that it has a flower bud this year. I know that Fran has this tree as well, his is probably flowering goodo.

We are constantly told that we should live in the here and now, but at times it is well nigh impossible not to look ahead. The reason I am saying this now is that I think my R. calophytum has produced flower buds for the first time, so if I am right, there is some treat in store next spring or early summer.

More Hydrangeas.

11 July 2017 22:33:54

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Evening all. The Hydrangeas continue to astound, what marvellous shrubs they are with such variety of flower colour, shape and form.

I know some people consider the lacecaps to be more subtle, but I love all types. Having said that, the lacecap in the first photo is splendid and quite beautiful.

The lacecap in the second photo has these lovely white flowers and these are very different in colour to the Hydrangea featured in the first shot. No names for either, I'm afraid.

The Hydrangea in the third photo is H. aspera macrophylla, which is very different in form from the other Hydrangeas in my garden and is just as beautiful.

Rhododendrons in the rain.

03 July 2017 20:33:02

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It is a very messy evening here and not at all summer-like, more's the pity. At least it suits the Rhododendrons.

The first shot I have for you is a general shot of a small section of the garden. The large leaved Rhodo is R. falconeri and I think the Hosta associates well with it. The dwarf Rhodo on the right is the rare R. pronum.

The second photo shows raindrops on some new foliage of R. flinckii. This is a very attractive species for foliage.

Talking of foliage, isn't R.bureavii fantastic for foliage. The underleaf indumentum is just beautiful. This Rhodo should be in every garden.

A polar bear and some more Hydrangeas.

30 June 2017 23:14:48

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Evenimg all and a lovely evening it is, if a little cool. The garden has the proverbial forty shades of green at the minute, with newer foliage often a lighter shade than the older and of course there is such variety in Rhodo foliage as well. The flowering season for Rhodos is almost over, bar a couple of repeat flowerings in some that have already flowered, but one that has yet to flower this year is the very late, R. polar bear and that will flower in the coming weeks with beautifully scented, large white flowers. Keep an eye out for it.

The second and third photos are of a couple more Hydrangeas, they are H. nikko blue and one I call Bridget's Hydrangea, called after my late grandmother as it came from a cutting in her garden.

Back to the land that time forgot.

28 June 2017 21:24:55

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The title may sound like one of those films from the seventies, but in reality it is my attempt to describe the garden after returning from two lovely weeks in Lagos in Portugal. I got the grass sorted yesterday, but the weeds and briars that seem to have grown at the rate of knots will be an ongoing challenge over the next week or so.

Hydrangeas are the dominant flowering force in the garden at the minute and what marvellous shrubs they are and the first two photos show the flowers of two of them. No names I'm afraid.

The beautiful Eucryphia lucida 'ballerina' is also in full bloom and what a classy lady she is.

We had good wi-fi in our apartment and it was nice to be able to read your journals while sitting on the balcony. I was disappointed to read that there was ongoing problems with the site and that some of the regular contributers are very disenchanted and tempted to stop contributing. I hope that doesn't happen as I will stay to the bitter end as I am not on Facebook and refuse to do so. 

There was a fabulous Magnolia grandiflora on the grounds of the complex and wouldn't I love if I could grow one. I should have brought back some of the heat with me and that would give it half a chance.

Courage in the face of adversity.

08 June 2017 16:09:34

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Battering and buffeting from the wind and rain isn't conducive to Paeonia flowers giving their best display, but they are still lovely all the same.

The first one shown is R. bowl of beauty and the second is P. moon of nippon.

The third shot is of the bell shaped flowers of my Zenobia pulverulenta. This is a really lovely, desirable shrub and another that I am extremely fond of. 

Small flowers, salmon and a rarity.

07 June 2017 21:13:14

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Evening all, woeful weather but what's new with that. 

I think that Kalmia argustifolia is a great shrub and a good addition to a garden that has the soil to suit it. Jacinta has said that she doesn't like the small flowers, but I find them attractive. Different strokes for different folks.

It would be very hard to dislike R. tortoiseshell orange, a smashing hybrid. In fairness the flower colour is more salmon than orange, but that doesn't detract from it in any way.

So many of the Rhodos have opened new foliage and to my mind this can be as attractive as the flowering season. Shown is R. platypodum, a species which is almost extinct in the wild and which was the main reason I added it to the garden a few years ago, and am I happy I did as the foliage is just terrific. It will be some specimen in time.

Get on your bike and ride.

29 May 2017 12:54:44

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I would consider myself a fairly observant person, especially where my Rhodos and Azaleas are concerned so I was amazed a few days ago to see a first ever flower truss on the species Rhodo, R.insigne. How I missed it up to that I don't know, my excuse is that it was close to the ground. When my son was learning to cycle a number of years ago, he managed to plough through the middle of this Rhodo on two occasions. I don't know did Sean Kellys parents have those tribulations. Despite these setbacks it recovered very well and it is now a very attractive Rhodo for foliage, and as the photo shows for flowers as well. 

Paeonia veitchii var woodwardii is an utterly delightful species Paeonia and is a really nice plant to have in the garden.

I have been raving lately on the merits of deciduous Azaleas and the last photo for now shows the flowers of the scented A. anneke.

A kaleidoscope of colour.

26 May 2017 21:29:07

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Evening all. A bit of drizzle at times, but the heavy rain has stayed away thus far. The garden is looking great, with plenty to admire.

R. furnivalls daughter is a very free flowering hybrid Rhododendron and is very impressive. I have noticed it has a light scent which I haven't seen mentioned in any articles I have read about it.

The species deciduous Azalea, A luteum is a wonderful, scented  Azalea and is a great addition to any garden.

I have mentioned many times how fond I am of deciduous Azaleas and the hybrids really give magnificent displays and often are scented as well. The last photo shows A. glowing embers on the left and A. golden flare on the right. They really are splendid. The observant among you will notice the lovely Kalmia on the left of the photo, I will show that another evening.

I hope you all have a lovely weekend.

 

 

Monday evening Rhododendrons.

22 May 2017 19:19:06

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Evening everyone, the first photo I have for you this evening is of a couple of flower trusses on R. brachycarpum var roseum, which is a dwarf form of the species and very nice it is too.

The second photo is of a flower truss on R. gomer waterer, a common hybrid, but a really good one and well worth having in the garden.

The third shot is of A. golden flare, a lovely, scented deciduous Azalea which has some other beautiful shrubs for company. This section of the garden has turned out extremely well.

Flying solo and combinations.

19 May 2017 20:23:45

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Evening all, as an old neighbour of mine used to say years ago, 'it's no day for a bee'. That may be so, but it is always a good time to show off some of my Rhododendrons.

The first shot is of R. catawbiense boursault, a common hybrid, but I like the flower colour and it always puts on a decent show.

I love the second photo as it does a good job of showing what my garden is all about. The Oak in the background sets off the two Rhodos (L to R. unknown and R.marcel menard) to perfection with the Cotinus doing a photobomb to the right. Just lovely.

The third photo shows off another combination that I am pleased with. R. ponticum variegatum is one of the two most common variegated Rhodos, (the other being R. goldflimmer), and here I have it paired with that very fine hybrid, R. graziela.

I wish you all a lovely weekend.

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