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accsean's Journal

accsean's Journal

Last Post 18 days 4 hours ago

Courage in the face of adversity.

08 June 2017 16:09:34

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Battering and buffeting from the wind and rain isn't conducive to Paeonia flowers giving their best display, but they are still lovely all the same.

The first one shown is R. bowl of beauty and the second is P. moon of nippon.

The third shot is of the bell shaped flowers of my Zenobia pulverulenta. This is a really lovely, desirable shrub and another that I am extremely fond of. 

Small flowers, salmon and a rarity.

07 June 2017 21:13:14

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Evening all, woeful weather but what's new with that. 

I think that Kalmia argustifolia is a great shrub and a good addition to a garden that has the soil to suit it. Jacinta has said that she doesn't like the small flowers, but I find them attractive. Different strokes for different folks.

It would be very hard to dislike R. tortoiseshell orange, a smashing hybrid. In fairness the flower colour is more salmon than orange, but that doesn't detract from it in any way.

So many of the Rhodos have opened new foliage and to my mind this can be as attractive as the flowering season. Shown is R. platypodum, a species which is almost extinct in the wild and which was the main reason I added it to the garden a few years ago, and am I happy I did as the foliage is just terrific. It will be some specimen in time.

Get on your bike and ride.

29 May 2017 12:54:44

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I would consider myself a fairly observant person, especially where my Rhodos and Azaleas are concerned so I was amazed a few days ago to see a first ever flower truss on the species Rhodo, R.insigne. How I missed it up to that I don't know, my excuse is that it was close to the ground. When my son was learning to cycle a number of years ago, he managed to plough through the middle of this Rhodo on two occasions. I don't know did Sean Kellys parents have those tribulations. Despite these setbacks it recovered very well and it is now a very attractive Rhodo for foliage, and as the photo shows for flowers as well. 

Paeonia veitchii var woodwardii is an utterly delightful species Paeonia and is a really nice plant to have in the garden.

I have been raving lately on the merits of deciduous Azaleas and the last photo for now shows the flowers of the scented A. anneke.

A kaleidoscope of colour.

26 May 2017 21:29:07

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Evening all. A bit of drizzle at times, but the heavy rain has stayed away thus far. The garden is looking great, with plenty to admire.

R. furnivalls daughter is a very free flowering hybrid Rhododendron and is very impressive. I have noticed it has a light scent which I haven't seen mentioned in any articles I have read about it.

The species deciduous Azalea, A luteum is a wonderful, scented  Azalea and is a great addition to any garden.

I have mentioned many times how fond I am of deciduous Azaleas and the hybrids really give magnificent displays and often are scented as well. The last photo shows A. glowing embers on the left and A. golden flare on the right. They really are splendid. The observant among you will notice the lovely Kalmia on the left of the photo, I will show that another evening.

I hope you all have a lovely weekend.

 

 

Monday evening Rhododendrons.

22 May 2017 19:19:06

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Evening everyone, the first photo I have for you this evening is of a couple of flower trusses on R. brachycarpum var roseum, which is a dwarf form of the species and very nice it is too.

The second photo is of a flower truss on R. gomer waterer, a common hybrid, but a really good one and well worth having in the garden.

The third shot is of A. golden flare, a lovely, scented deciduous Azalea which has some other beautiful shrubs for company. This section of the garden has turned out extremely well.

Flying solo and combinations.

19 May 2017 20:23:45

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Evening all, as an old neighbour of mine used to say years ago, 'it's no day for a bee'. That may be so, but it is always a good time to show off some of my Rhododendrons.

The first shot is of R. catawbiense boursault, a common hybrid, but I like the flower colour and it always puts on a decent show.

I love the second photo as it does a good job of showing what my garden is all about. The Oak in the background sets off the two Rhodos (L to R. unknown and R.marcel menard) to perfection with the Cotinus doing a photobomb to the right. Just lovely.

The third photo shows off another combination that I am pleased with. R. ponticum variegatum is one of the two most common variegated Rhodos, (the other being R. goldflimmer), and here I have it paired with that very fine hybrid, R. graziela.

I wish you all a lovely weekend.

Preferences and associations.

18 May 2017 18:29:23

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Very showery here this afternoon and evening, but I got out to take a few photos anyway.

I have a preference for the deciduous Azaleas over the evergreen Azaleas but I have to say that the evergreens can be very impressive in flower and A. kermesina rose is a good example. 

The second photo shows the deciduous Azalea, A homebush and I just love this shrub. It is extremely attractive in every way and the photo explains better than I can put in words why I prefer the deciduous type.

My Crinodendron has never looked or flowered better, it is a very impressive large shrub at this stage and associates very well with neighbouring Rhodos and Azaleas. I wouldn't be without it.

Rho no!!!

15 May 2017 18:37:53

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I was saddened today to get an email from Glendoick nursery saying they are discontinuing mail order due to various reasons, which are well worth reading if you log onto their website. I would like to wish them all the best for the future and I will sorely miss my yearly order. My garden is full of their fantastic plants. I will have to try and get another source for my Rhododendrons. Millais nursery looks a good option, I will keep you posted. Credit to my son for the journal title.

The latest and last of my Magnolias to flower is M. williamsii, I had one flower last year and will have five or so this year. They have a lovely scent and I am very fond of this wonderful Magnolia.

An old and very reliable hybrid is R. alfred and every year is as good as the previous one for flowers.

It would be fair to say that my sister isn't into gardening so you can imagine my surprise when she purchased an evergreen Azalea at a local market. She had been sizing them up for a few weeks and was smitten. Of course the poor girl didn't realise she needed ericaceous compost for it as she wanted to put in a bigger planter and now she has to gather rainwater for it as well. Is she converted?, I'll have to wait and see. In her honour the third shot shows a couple of my evergreen Azaleas and other plants on a section of the bank at the back of the house.

Singing and dancing in the rain.

12 May 2017 19:30:29

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The rain finally arrived around two o'clock and even though not heavy, it is constant and if one listens carefully, you can hear the shrubs and trees singing songs of thanks.

R. sneezy and R. dreamland are two hybrids that go well together and even the dull, rainy evening doesn't take from their display. I reckon it's a waltz.

The only Rhodo I don't have a name for is featured in the second photo, I almost lost this three or four years back and nearly took it out but thankfully I am slow to take that step and it recovered brilliantly and has thrived since. Fatal hesitation, I don't think so.

The third photo is a close up of a rain drenched R. marcel menard truss.

Two commoners and a rarity.

10 May 2017 19:52:37

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Evening all and wasn't it another lovely day.

R. graziela is a hybrid that is very popular these days, and with good reason as it is very attractive with its narrow foliage. The flowers are nice as well so it is one to be recommended as it isn't difficult to obtain.

A Rhododendron species that isn't easy to obtain is R.wardi. The form I have is the Ludlow and Sherriff one from South Tibet and I just love the flowers. They are a little more yellow in colour than they appear in the photo and are really beautiful. 

The largest evergreen Azalea in my garden is A. geisha orange and it is mightily impressive in full bloom as it is now. This is very easy to obtain and is invaluable at this time of year.

A benign Sweeney Todd in waiting.

09 May 2017 20:33:52

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What a heavenly day it was, good for the heart and soul.

The garden continues to please as well and I will start this evening with the fantastic species, R yakushimanum. This is the parent of so many good hybrids in the yak series, but to my mind the parent species is superior.

Isn't it very pleasing when plant placements go according to plan and work out, I just adore the way that the flowers of the deciduous Azalea hybrid, A persil, complement the flowers of my Choisya ternata.

Deutzias go very well in a garden like mine and mine is a prolific bloomer. I will have to give it a good haircut this year when it has finished flowering. In the meantime I can enjoy the lovely scented flowers.

Shakin' all over.

08 May 2017 14:51:08

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As the weather has been so good it is almost sinful to be on a computer posting a journal but it is important to keep the site active so here goes. 

I feel that at times my inclination to include Rhodos in every journal is a bit off-putting for those of you who don't share my passion for them, so here is a rare Rhodo free journal.

Cercis siliquastrum is a large growing shrub or small tree and I am very fond of it. I have read that it needs a good summer the previous year for it to flower well, but last years summer was no great shakes to say the least and it is flowering very well in spite of it. The photo shows an opened flower and others on the point of opening. The shape of mine is best described as all over the place, a bit like myself, but that adds to the charm.

The latest Paeonia to flower is Paeonia officinalis, which may be a very common Paeonia, but that doesn't make it any less garden worthy.

The third photo is of a flower on Magnolia subcordata, which is a lovely yellow/green colour.

Bud watch, Tree Paeonia and R. point defiance.

01 May 2017 19:52:24

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The bud watch series featuring R. bureavii comes to a conclusion this evening and I would like to thank those of you who commented and stuck with it, much appreciated. I must say the flower truss is lovely and was worth waiting for.

The second photo shows the second of my tree Paeonias to flower, this is from a cutting from my Mams garden which I planted a few years ago and it has really taken off this year.  The flowers are beautiful, with a lovely scent as well.

Another hybrid which I adore for its flowers is R. point defiance, the flowers are quite simply awesome.

A first time for everything.

28 April 2017 16:53:06

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Afternoon all. A great scented shrub for this time of the year is Choisya ternata. I can never have enough scented shrubs in the garden, they add a whole new dimension.

R.arctic tern hasn't scented flowers, but they are very different than a lot of Rhodo flowers and I like them very much.

I mentioned in yesterdays journal that the new growth on some shrubs got damaged by the frosts of a few nights ago and a couple of my species deciduous Azaleas suffered, but thankfully they will recover and put out new growth. I am very pleased that the new foliage on A. quinquefolium didn't get damaged as it is a stunningly beautiful folige plant, I will most likely do a triple somersalt (for the first time in my life) when it reaches flowering age, but until that fateful day it is worth growing for the foliage alone.

Staying positive.

27 April 2017 13:54:02

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Always being one to dwell on the positive, I won't go into the damage that the frosts of a couple of nights ago did to some of the Rhodo flowers and also to some of the new growth, but with the sort of shrubs I grow, late frosts will always cause damage. Obviously the flowers won't recover, but new foiage buds should appear to compensate for the damaged new growth. To up the tension a bit, I won't reveal how the 'bud watch' bud on R. bureavii fared until next monday.

Thankfully, there is still plenty to admire in the garden. The first photo shows the flowers on the species R.dichroanthum ssp scyphocalyx and very attractive they are too.

Photo no 2 shows one of the flowers of the beautiful tree Paeonia, P lutea var ludlowii. This tree Paeonia is also one of the finest for foliage and I am very fond of it.

The third shot shows the first of my deciduous Azaleas to flower this year and it is the hybrid, A. golden sunset. Deciduous Azaleas bring fantastic colour to the late spring and early summer garden and I think that anyone who has the soil that suits them should grow a collection and they will be well rewarded.

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